A-to-Z 2015 B is for Biscuits

Updated for National Biscuit Day!

Biscuits? I know you’re thinking, what do biscuits have to do with the theme of Down Home Thoughts and wisdom passed along from my Grandmother.  Well relax for minute or two and I’ll try to explain. My grandmother made THE BEST biscuits ever. I’ve found a few places that come close, but none that get it the way she did.  She never used a recipe. It was some flour sifted out on the counter, a pinch of salt, some baking powder and baking soda and some fresh buttermilk.  Mix it all up, put it in a greased skillet and pop it in a hot oven. A few minutes later, mouth-watering, hot steamy goodness is ready to melt the freshly made butter and have slathered on some fresh made jam, honey or molasses. Many really good chats about how school was going and what subjects did I like and how was vacation were had over biscuits. Grandma knew that no one listens very well on an empty stomach. Many times I saw Grandma bake biscuits just for company that dropped by to chat. The biscuits always disappeared quickly and the conversation always seemed a bit better. Grandma knew the power of biscuits.

National Biscuit Day! Hot biscuits, butter and honey.  Mmmmmm

Hot biscuits, butter and honey. Mmmmmm

67 thoughts on “A-to-Z 2015 B is for Biscuits

  1. Pottsy

    American biscuits confuse me, they look like British scones. Either way they look amazing and I would definitely want to pop round to chat to your grandma if these were on offer, plus it sounds like she has some pretty cool insights to share too.

    Reply
    1. shawn

      I do love the vagaries of the English language. There are so many differences while remaining more or less the same. Glad you liked the post. Yes, Grandma was an amazing woman. Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!

      Reply
  2. Milanka's Fine Food

    Yes they do look like scones (that is what they are called here in Australia). They look delicious and the memories that your grandma left with you are priceless. 🙂 🙂

    Reply
    1. shawn

      Typically American (especially in the South) biscuits are much softer than scones. Yes, Grandma did not leave physical wealth. What she left was much more valuable and I hope to share that . Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!

      Reply
      1. roweeee

        Yes, I’ve definitely seen scones that could have broken windows, although that’s not the sort of texture you’re aiming for. Should be soft inside yet crunchy outside.

        Reply
  3. Pam

    I’ve got posts all about my grandmother and her cooking and philosophies on the blog that I am not using for the challenge. Grandmothers are the best, aren’t they? I miss mine every single day. Loved this post. And now I want a biscuit.

    Reply
    1. shawn

      Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts! I do miss her, but she left some amazing memories and impacted my life and that of others a great deal. I hope to share at least a small bit of what she passed along. I always want a biscuit, but I’m trying to lose a bit of weight. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!

      Reply
    1. shawn

      Grandma was an amazing lady. A great cook, seamstress, quilter and friend, but more importantly an amazing role model. Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts!

      Reply
  4. momaloft

    I’m having such a time leaving comments on WordPress blogs so I’m not sure if my first comment worked or not. Lucky you, I’m trying again. LOL Anyway, I have several posts on the blog I am not using for the challenge this year about my grandmother’s cooking and philosophies. Her biscuits were handmade from scratch daily and I LOVED them. They melted in your mouth. She never used a recipe either. Did you ever try a tomato from the garden on one of those buttered delights? To. Die. For. 🙂 I loved this post! And now I want a biscuit.

    Reply
    1. shawn

      I did get your first post. 🙂 Fresh food from the garden is amazing no matter how you eat it! Granddaddy liked bacon or ham and tomato on a biscuit 🙂 Truly amazing and simple food.

      Reply
  5. Alex Hurst

    Why do you torment me with those mouth-watering morsels?! Oh, I miss southern biscuits with a passion. I really just need to learn how to make them myself. (Thanks for the post. 🙂 )

    Reply
    1. shawn

      The recipe is simple. Flour, a pinch of baking power, baking soda, a pinch of salt and add butter milk until the is just barely sticky. Work with your hands until smooth (not very much) and then dust with flour, roll out to desired thickness and then cut with a large glass 🙂

      Reply
      1. Alex Hurst

        Thank you! I’ll have to explore them when I get to Vancouver. There’s no butter milk over here! 🙁 Or real butter under $10, either, actually.

        Reply
  6. Susan

    Those definitely look mouthwatering, but I too am trying to lose a little weight 🙂 My grandmother didn’t use a recipe either, though I have to. Fun-fact: the UK pronunciation of scones is ‘scons’ and doesn’t rhyme with bones 🙂

    Reply
  7. NotAPunkRocker

    When my former mother-in-law passed away a few years ago, M swore off biscuits and gravy because that was her special breakfast she made just for him. Nothing else comes close, it seems.

    Reply
  8. luckyjc007

    I like this post…it makes me hungry for some homemade biscuits! I can relate to this story because I had an aunt that made some really awesome biscuits. My sister inlaw was able to copy them but I ‘ve never had any success in doing it.

    Reply
    1. shawn

      Glad you could stop by and share your thoughts. Hope you find a good biscuit soon 🙂 I’ll stop by for a visit to your blog.

      Reply
  9. Silvia Writes

    Growing up with a grandma who knew how to make delicious biscuits must have been a delight. This reminds me a little of my grandma, whom a vaguely remember, but I associate sweet, wonderful smells coming from the kitchen with her. And I love how grandmas don’t really need a recipe, they just know how to make things right. Wonderful post. Look forward to reading more.

    Reply
    1. shawn

      Thanks for stopping by and sharing your thoughts! It always amazed me when she tried to teach me a recipe, there was never any precise measure. Season to taste was used a lot 🙂

      Reply
  10. Petal and Mortar

    I do a two-ingredient version. And it’s easy to make buttermilk…for the reader that didn’t have access to any. Just put 1 tablespoon of lime juice or white vinegar into a cup of milk, wait for 10 minutes and use the lot in place of buttermilk (even the curdled bits).

    Reply
    1. shawn

      Awesome tip! I have read about that, but never tried it. Does it need to be whole milk or will it work with 2% or skim?

      Reply
  11. Nadine

    My mouth is watering. I’m thinking some drizzled honey on some biscuits.

    My grandma was a seamstress who worked out of her home. When people came over for their fittings, they always ended up in the dining room with coffee and some sort of snack. There, they would pour their hearts out to her about whatever was going on in their lives. This post brought back those memories.

    Reply
  12. Sue Archer

    I remember my mother talking about her grandmother and how she always had cookies ready for her when she came down the street to visit. So much love there. Isn’t it wonderful?

    Reply
  13. Cheryl Wright

    I love biscuits. I only made them once because they came out so hard that I was told that I should send them to the military to use as weapons. I’m no Betty Crocker, that’s for sure.

    Reply
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    1. shawn

      not just of folklore if you were fortunate enough to grow up with them 🙂 But they do almost as well for as good a writing as they do eating. Thanks for dropping by.

      Reply
  15. roweeee

    I forgot all about you Americans and your weird applications of the English language. I was agreeing with you about how biscuits have made me very popular with kids, especially the kids’ scout group and then I see a scone. My biggest hit are my choc-chip cookies and ANZAC BIscuits went down well after we’d marched in the Dawn Service
    My contribution for B was Byron Bay: https://beyondtheflow.wordpress.com/2015/04/03/byron-bay-australias-alternative-paradise/ xx Rowena

    Reply
  16. roweeee

    I forgot all about you Americans and your weird applications of the English language. I was agreeing with you about how biscuits have made me very popular with kids, especially the kids’ scout group and then I see a scone. My biggest hit are my choc-chip cookies and ANZAC BIscuits went down well after we’d marched in the Dawn Service
    My contribution for B was Byron Bay: https://beyondtheflow.wordpress.com/2015/04/03/byron-bay-australias-alternative-paradise/ xx Rowena

    Reply
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